Blog Posts in December, 2016

  • Tip of the Week

    || 27-Dec-2016

    Always keep your attorney notified of any changes in your address or phone number. If you don’t you might miss important messages from the court as well as your attorney regarding changes in your court date or information.
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  • What Happens If I Don't Respond To A Discovery Demand?

    || 22-Dec-2016

    If you fail to answer a discovery demand you could be precluded from entering evidence, witnesses or testimony at the time of trial. Always respond and always keep your discovery response as up to date as possible. If you do miss a discovery date file the documentation with the opposing party as soon as possible to avoid delays that could cause prejudice to the other side.
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  • Tip of the Week

    || 19-Dec-2016

    Always write down your court date while you are in court. Things happen fast in the courtroom, but you will always be given the opportunity to write the next date down. If you miss the next court date because you forgot or made a mistake the consequences could be serious enough so that you would lose the case or have a warrant issued for your arrest.
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  • What Is Discovery?

    || 15-Dec-2016

    As an attorney I am often asked "what is discovery?" This is the legal method of exchanging paperwork and documentation that will be admitted into evidence at the time of trial so no one is unfairly prejudiced at the time of trial with the admission of documents. In a family court case discovery cannot occur without court permission.
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  • Tip of the Week

    || 12-Dec-2016

    Always abide by a Family Court order of protection, as they are just as enforceable as criminal orders of protection. This means that violations of Orders of Protections in Family Court are punishable by imprisonment of up to seven years or being placed on probation.
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  • If you have a valid custody and visitation order and the other parent does not return a child immediately go to a lawyer or directly to the court to file a petition. These orders are enforceable under the law and judges often take a dim view of a parents attempt to utilize “self help” by refusing to abide by a custody and visitation order.
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